A View from the TopLine

Tech Tip: Open a CSV file using C# .NET

Tech Tip: Open a CSV file using C# .NET

There are many occasions where you need to read data from a CSV file.  We commonly work with CSV files while doing data migrations from one system to another or when integrating between two systems.  Doing this using C# is not very difficult.

The simplest way to do so is to add a reference in your project to the Microsoft.

Thankful for Digital Marketing

Thankful for Digital Marketing

Thanksgiving 2017 has come and gone, but it’s never too late to be thankful!

I am thankful that marketing has entered the digital age. Back in the day, when I studied marketing in graduate school, we didn’t have the benefit of ubiquitous internet access, much less digital marketing automation.

Quick Tips: Searching in Act!

Quick Tips: Searching in Act!

Do you have issues finding information in your Act! database? Below are our top tips for searching in Act!.  

Searching in Act! using Universal Search
At the top right corner of the screen you will notice the “Search” bar.  From this box, you can do a universal search for any word in any record within your database.

TopLine Add-on Compatibility with Act! v20

TopLine Add-on Compatibility with Act! v20

In 2013, with the release of Act! v16, TopLine Results Corporation implemented a new upgrade policy for TopLine add-ons. TopLine add-ons purchased prior to August 2013 must be upgraded to be compatible with Act! v16 or later versions of Act!. For Act! v20, there is no TopLine add-on upgrade required if your TopLine add-on was purchased after August 2013 or the add-on was already upgraded for Act! v16.  For example, if you are currently using Act! v19 with two licenses of TopLine Designer, you would pay no upgrade charges for Designer when you upgrade to Act! v20.

This upgrade requirement primarily affects customers who purchased TopLine add-ons prior to August 2013 who now wish to upgrade their Act! software.

Lean Six Sigma for Commercial Processes? Of course!

Lean Six Sigma for Commercial Processes? Of course!

Six Sigma was a concept started in 1986 by two Motorola engineers, Bill Smith and Mikel J. Harry, who used statistical modeling and process control to minimize defects in manufacturing. Motorola trademarked the term in 1993, then Jack Welch made it central to his business strategy at General Electric in 1995. By the end of the 90s, most Fortune 500 companies had some form of Six Sigma program in place.

Duplicate Management in Salesforce Lightning

Duplicate Management in Salesforce Lightning

Duplicates! Every database has them and managing them can feel like a full-time job.  Does the following scenario sound familiar?

You have some new and updated information about a contact, Mary Miller, with whom you do business. You promptly search for her in Salesforce, so that you can update her record, ensuring that your colleagues will instantly have these key details about Mary at their fingertips next time they look her up.

Dynamics 365 Multi-Select Fields

Dynamics 365 Multi-Select Fields

An exciting new addition to Microsoft Dynamics 365, as of the July update, is a long-requested feature: multi-select fields (in other words, a drop-down menu that allows for multiple selections). Each of the selections in a multi-select field is known as an option set.

Dynamics 365 Update – Form and View Redesign

Dynamics 365 Update – Form and View Redesign

New forms and views are here, and they are better than ever! Since the Dynamics CRM 2013 update the user interface has seen many improvements but it has always been white. Now it’s white and …. (drum roll) … grey!

Forms
White and grey may not sound very different from the old forms, but it’s the use of grey that makes a huge difference.

Improve Your Processes with Data

Improve Your Processes with Data

Did you know that the 80/20 rule comes from Vilfredo Pareto, an Italian engineer, sociologist, economist, political scientist, and philosopher, who was born in the mid-1800s? The 80/20 rule, also known as the Pareto principle, was built on observations that 80% of the land in Italy was owned by about 20% of the population.